Monuments reveal

Story behind monument

Korean Comfort women touching monument

Korean Comfort women touching monument

Touching monument depicting a barefoot girl with a bird on her shoulder. In memory of Koreans forced to serve Japanese soldiers. Korean Comfort women touching monument

Korean Comfort women touching monument
In 2011, outside the Japanese embassy in Seoul, appeared a truly touching monument depicting a sitting young barefoot girl with a bird on her shoulder. In fact, the monument depicts so-called “comfort women” forced to work in brothels of the Japanese army during World War II. According to historical documents, during the war, about 200,000 women, mainly from Korea, as well as China, Taiwan, the Philippines and Indonesia, became sexual slaves of Japanese soldiers. And of course, the monument erected directly opposite the general consulate of Japan, became an object of irritation for the Japanese side.

Teenage girl as comfort woman statue

Dressed in warm knitted things teenage girl, comfort woman statue. Installed in 2011 in Seoul, South Korea

Meanwhile, the monument of a young girl, in fact a teenager, causes sincere pity and compassion. As a result, compassionate residents are trying to somehow help the poor girl statue. As you can see from the photo, she is dressed in warm knitted things, in particular a hat, scarf, and gloves. And on the table next to the girl – fresh flowers.

The bronze statue of a barefoot, seated girl put up in 2011 has become a rallying point for weekly protests. Japan considers its continuing presence outside the embassy in Seoul to be provocative – and a hint that South Korea is not ready to let the issue go.

Korean Comfort women touching monument

sources:
telegraph.co.uk
pikabu.ru